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Mickers
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Question for linux users.

What do you actually do with linux? I mean it's not compatible with pretty much everything (video games, programs, ect). That is as far as my limited knowledge of it goes.
I have one friend that uses it and the only thing he tells me is it boots up fast and he watches movies on the internet with it... But seriously what's the point of using something that you can't do anything on? Am I missing something. Please enlighten me. :?

MacroMan!
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What do you actually do with linux?


Pretty much anything you can do on Windows and Mac unless your heavily into PC gaming.

There are a lot of benefits to running Linux and with some of the more advanced distros (Ubuntu 10.04 LTS) for example, it's very usable, more so than Windows when you overlook learning a new interface. It's also a lot more secure, for instance, you can't even get an anti virus for Linux (AFAIK), simply because you don't need one. A well defined set of firewall rules is all you need.

There are far too many benefits to mention in my post, but it's a worth a check out, even if just for a playaround (you can run most distro's direct from CD to try them).

Don't forget most Linux distros are open source and free.

you could just as easily use CMD or batch scritps on Windows then as it has similar commands to Bash

Not really. Have you checked out Bash scripting? It really is very powerful. If you think about it, most commands in Linux, in the pre-gnome days, was done on the command line, and indeed a lot of stuff in Linux must still be done on the command line today. Unlike Window$, Everything in Linux can be done in Bash scripting.

Just the size of this tutorial: <!-- m -->http://tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/<!-- m --> should be enough to show you how powerful it is.

David
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Mickers
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Thx MacroMan!. Appreciate it. I may have to check it out if I ever get a machine I can partition.

tank
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Google is working on a product called native client. Basically you can port your typical app to run in a chrome web client in extreme short time. weeks for couple million line program. Some games have already been ported for such. no download or installing. Chrome works in linux. If native client takes off its a matter of time before everything we like about windows gaming works in linux.

Mickers, I do alot in linux and aside from games there are open source versions of almost every App for windows.

Bash and CMD are not even close to equals. I am an expert batch script writer and a novice at bash. that said BASH is way greater than CMD in every conceivable way. I after having learned BASH basics hate CMD. CMD is like asking a chimpanzee to write a novel on nuclear physics. Bash is like asking a nuclear physicist to write the same book.

Bash is like having CMD+WMI+VBS+Powershell and then some.

Ubuntu is pretty user friendly and almost as easy to install as win7
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MacroMan!
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Bash is like having CMD+WMI+VBS+Powershell and then some.

and the some more...

Ubuntu is pretty user friendly and almost as easy to install as win7

Have you tried Ubuntu 11.10? It's so ridiculously easy to install. My 2yo nephew could prob install it.
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TheGreatSwami Woo
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Dont get me wrong I would like to move to LInux but two things stop me.

1 The great and very wide choice of apps on wndows, I like to video edit and like Sony vegas - I looked at the linux alternatives and they were not as good. I also like Photoshop and the Gimp is not as good. Life would just be harder on LInux, for instance my Dutch friend has an aging computer and I tried putting linux on it but when it comes to doing his TAX return which you have to do by computer in holland - they dont have a program for LInux.

2 No AutoHotkey

3 I wonder how many other apps it would lack - is there a SKYPE for linux?

tank
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and the some more...

+1

...Ubuntu 11.10?..

i know right it almost does everything except download and burn the image for you.
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MacroMan!
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Dont get me wrong I would like to move to LInux but two things stop me.

1 The great and very wide choice of apps on wndows, I like to video edit and like Sony vegas - I looked at the linux alternatives and they were not as good. I also like Photoshop and the Gimp is not as good. Life would just be harder on LInux, for instance my Dutch friend has an aging computer and I tried putting linux on it but when it comes to doing his TAX return which you have to do by computer in holland - they dont have a program for LInux.

2 No AutoHotkey

3 I wonder how many other apps it would lack - is there a SKYPE for linux?


You will be very surprised how many apps really are available for Linux. Almost everything has an equivalent which is free. If you have Photoshop CS2 or above, then it will run perfectly under WINE (windows emulator) in Linux. Adobe did a project a few years back to make sure all their products run well in Linux.

Skype for Linux: <!-- m -->http://www.skype.com... ... ter/linux/<!-- m -->

With all distros of Linux (confirmed Ubuntu), it's very easy to create a dual boot setup, so you can keep windows and boot into it when required.
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tank
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Or for the really cautious simly download and install virtual box and install your flav of linux
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Frankie
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On Linux I use a combination of Python and Bash. On FireFox I use Vimperator, which I like better than ahk for browser automation.

I haven't really gotten into X11 automation yet, i.e. windows, artificial input and hotkeys. That's where I think needs work.
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TheGreatSwami Woo
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Some of you have recommended Ubuntu, I heard somewhere that Ubuntu is good for Mac users and PClinuxOS for former windows users, is that so?

Also what is the experience of some of you Linux users when it comes to devices that you have bought - is it easy to get the software to get them to work with linux, I am thinking of mp3 players you plug into your computer and just of the top of my head I recently updated my TOMTOM on my PC with no problems, would that work with Linux? Also my Canon scanner and Canon printer... What I am wondering is maybe it's not just less choice of software but you might find it hard to get some hardware to work?

tank
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I am a windows user that like ubuntu better
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MacroMan!
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In my experience (on Ubuntu), I have found that most hardware will just plug and play. Was surprised me the most when I started using Ubuntu about 6 months ago, was that drivers that took me hours to track down for obscure hardware on Windows, just worked without any configuration when plugged into an Ubuntu system.

I recently got a new computer at work that has a large gforce graphics card. Upon installing Ubuntu 10.04 LTS, it already had the correct drivers for all the hardware.

The Ubuntu community has worked very hard over the years to ensure that it's fully compatible with all types and makes of hardware. It's worth googeling for Linux versions of your favourite applications and I'm sure you will be surprised at the availabilty.

If your going to try Ubuntu out, I would suggest getting the 10.04 LTS version as the latest 11.10 version hasn't been out long and is using an experimental version of gnome (desktop style) which I don't think is very good. Just my opinion.

David
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TheGreatSwami Woo
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Not sure I could manage without AHK and my favourite script by Silkcom "Keyword launcher" It doesnt need any input box I just type the name of a program or folder and it opens

haccduder
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Question for linux users.

What do you actually do with linux? I mean it's not compatible with pretty much everything (video games, programs, ect). That is as far as my limited knowledge of it goes.
I have one friend that uses it and the only thing he tells me is it boots up fast and he watches movies on the internet with it... But seriously what's the point of using something that you can't do anything on? Am I missing something. Please enlighten me. :?


On the desktop it's a hobbyists OS. Imagine driving a car that let you see through the body and hood to all the working parts. Imagine the tools were so universally simple that you could fix anything and tear it all the way down with the tools in your garage. Imagine if people made their own custom parts for this car that they gave away for free simply because they wanted people to use them.

That's pretty much the brick and mortar equivalent. Also, once you step into the professional world, linux is pretty much an engineers OS. Simple, easy to automate, easy to see everything going on, and as rock stable as the hardware it runs on.